Tag Archives: Rheumatism

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Frederick City ~ September 14th, 1862: Burnside and Rebel Prisoners

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Categories: Jamie & Katie, Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

See how he scrawls in the margins? It’s so hard to read, but I’ve done my best and referred to my grandmother’s old transcription.

#8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Envelope

#8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Page One #8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Page Two

 

 

            Frederick City, md

Sunday [afternoon] 4 ½ Oclock

Sept. 14th, 1862

 

My Dear Wife,

I now sit down to pen you a few lines let you know how we get along we are well ex the rheumatism I have it in my right leg so has Horace in his r leg it hurts us to march but we hoble along and keep up Twiss & Macaty as well.

we camped at new market last night started from there this morning at 7 Oclock got here at 12 OC Dis of 8 miles without any Breakfast not a mouth full here I got one loaf of bread about as large as your fist for 15 cent the rebels eat up every thing could get in Frederick while they was here, 500 rebels prisoner here in a brick building I have been down to see them. They look tough I tell you they are fiting 8 miles from here we can hear as plain as day a constant fire of cannon the sick wounded are coming in to this city all the time lots of them. but you need not worrie about me fore we shant have a chance to fight for Burnside drives them faster than we can go Burnside will kill all of rebels and kill us trying to get up with him he is on one side of the river Macll on the other Jackson in a tite place. we are on the ground where they fought Thursday now and then a spot of blood on the ground in the next lot to us. I went [off] after some water just now into the city I stoped to a house and got some dinner the woman was strong union I got two cups of tea some ham tomatoes bread Butter she would not take any pay I took her husband’s name Lewis V. Schole. She took my name told if I ever came this way again to stop her husband is with Burnside fiting the rebels good.

I have just been at roll call now I must close this so it will go to night if possible. we have good news Burnside has just brought 250 Rebels prisoners in to the city by our camp I saw them they looked bad enough they are not two that are dresst alike, dirty & [ragged] barefooted at that

we get along first rate for soldiers so don’t worrie about us I have wrote all about us you wanted me to

They are fiting like tigers I tell you we shall load our guns to night for the rebs.

So good night

we all send love to all

Horace said he did not feel able to write this time you can tell Charlotte

Please excuse this writing for is is in hurri wrote on a plate good by from your loving husband James

 

You may send me stamps if you please they are hard to get

Direct as before C I 16th W.D.C.

 

A couple of brief notes: Ambrose Burnside was a general and I’m pretty sure the “Macll” Jamie refers to is George B. McClellan, who was a major general. Both of them played very important roles in the Battle of Antietam, during which they spent a great deal of the time bickering about tactics via couriers. As you may know, that battle ended up being a huge bloody mess with over 22,000 dead, wounded, or missing. But we’ll get to Antietam later.

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Near Frederick ~ September 11th, 1862: Dear Parents

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I have some notes from my grandmother I plan on posting soon regarding some of the things I had questions about, but in the interest of just keeping this blog going I’ll probably start posting more letters with minimal commentary. One important note though – Robert is James’s brother.

Also, I’m going to try to restrain myself from editing and adding punctuation or fixing spelling errors. Of course I say this now, right after I’ve transcribed one of James’s only legible letters. As you can see, he took special care to write in neat handwriting with passable spelling when writing to his parents. Apparently he was a little more concerned about the impression his letter would leave on them than he was with the impression Katie would get from his insane sprawling handwriting and cramped side-note-ridden margins.

#7 Dear Parents - Sep 11, 1862 Page One

#7 Dear Parents - Sep 11, 1862 Page Two #7 Dear Parents - Sep 11, 1862 Page Three

In Maryland                        September 11, 1862

Not knowing where we are I cannot tell you the name of the place

My dear parents                                                            Thursday night by candle-light

I now take this opportunity to let you know how we get along I am well except some rheumatism in my right leg and shoulders Horace to is well except a blister on his heel, we left our encampment in Leesboro this morning at 7 oclock marched 15 miles to this place got here at half past 4 oclock PM it was a hard march it rained most all the time the road was rough and my leg was a little sore Horace & Mr. Twiss and myself lagged on behind although we kept up with them we are near Frederick where Jackson is but that does not scare me we march again in the morning do not know what direction it matters not. it raines  now but we have got out shelter tents, I went over to a farm house and got some straw to sleep on so we are comfortable Sargent Macarty, Mr. Twiss Horace, Corporal Peckham are in one tent together sergeant is writing to his wife I to you and my wife & friends I left Robert in Virginia I supose he is well I do not stand in need of anything but should like to see you all and Katie for a short time but would not leave my country for I think it is my duty to do what I can. We have Prayer meetings as often as we can thank the Lord. I should have wrote to you before but did not have time we we have to march and drill most all the time but will write as often as I can you must do the same. I have not heard from home since I left Hartford should like to hear first rate expect to every day I cannot write half as much as I should like to must draw this to a close for tonight for it is time for roll call then the light is put out will write more in the morning if I can so good bye once and all for tonight Mr. Twiss sends his respects to my friends Katie knows him Horace sends his love also he will not write this time good night tell father to take care of himself                                                                        with love

September 12                        Lebanon Chourch

Dear Mother, Damaskus, Montgomery Country md

Friday night we moved on 15 miles from where we was last night got to this place at 5 oclock along march and a hard one. I had the rheumatism pretty hard this morning when we left at 7 oclock I walked a little ways then had to fall out they took me into the ambalance carried me about 2 miles then I walked the rest of the way Horace has got very sore feet he could not keep up in the ranks but we hobbled along behind we are very tired. Charles Parker & Perry Woodford and your James has just been over to a house to get some supper we got two cups of tea some fried ham potatoes hoecakes for 25 centers apiece we are 10 miles from Frederick City they have been fighting to day. Burnside and Jackson we can hear every big gun that is fired it sounds ugly. Good news a carrier had just come from Frederick the news is Burnside had whiped Jackson and taken back Frederick city good we will be there tomorrow if nothing happens I must close this for this time I am tired and lame and sore and will write no more it is 8 oclock at night tomorrow we expect to fight or next day

Well good bye

from your ever loving son James

love to all

write soon

Direct as before

Company I 16 Reg CT Vol Washington DC

from James WP

please write to me

by gorris please write to Horace

James

 

Jamie was younger than I am now when writing this letter, yet he complains of rheumatism. I guess we’d all be complaining of rheumatism if we had to march 15 miles every damn day.