Tag Archives: Horace

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Sharpsburg, MD ~ September 21st, 1862: Details About the Dead

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This letter expands on Jamie’s previous account of the aftermath of Antietam, describing the way in which several of the soldiers died. He urges Katie once again to write to Mrs. Macarty to tell her that her husband has died, and to specifically mention that he was shot in the head and died instantly.

#12 Sharpsburg, MD - Sep 21st, 1862 Envelope #12 Sharpsburg, MD - Sep 21st, 1862 Page One #12 Sharpsburg, MD - Sep 21st, 1862 Page Two

 

            Sharpsburg md

Sunday morning Sep 21, 1862

 

To my Dear Loving wife,

as I have a few moments to write you a few lines I am well hope this to find you the same I received two letters from you last night at 8 oclock was glad to see them and hear from you I gess you can think so any how I do I wish could get another soon I should be so glad it is good to hear from you my dear and all at home. Corporal Harras that the rebels took a prisoner has been paroled and got back to us just now we was glad to see him back Horace money to him that was good thing for Horace when Horace was shot he gave Harris his money for he did not expect to get away alive then it is all right now. we exspect to march to for some place I but dont know where. Some say we are a going to Richmond I dont know as it is true. The 8 & 11 Co Reg are with us Eugene Comstalk in here he is well. Colon Kingsbury. J. H. Kingsberry was shot dead last Wednesday in the fight with us. Capt John Griswold was wounded that day has since died in our Co I. Capt Drake through hart, first Leu Horton through head. Ordley Sgt. Ovil Campbell shot in head & body 1 [Sgt.] Maccarty shot through head. Jason E Twiss in the brest. Steven Himes st in the brest. A Truesdell through brest.

Corporal Evians shot through body. James Grugan through body shot dead on the field. 8 of them, 20 others wounded, 3 taken prisoner one got back Corp Harras. he will take this letter to a postoffice some where on his route home he has been parolled by the rebels so he can go home he is [off] in a few minutes so I have got to hurrie up my caks[?] I should like to see you first rate but I cannot so I must not think about it I shall be glad when can Horace has got one broken leg the other is woundid badley to I gess he will get along in time if he has good care I had to leave him at hospitle yesterday morning I felt bad enough to part with him tell you but it cannot be helpt in war times we have to put up with many things. I mean to do my douty as near as posable god being my helper and strength I hope to see you some day when tell you better than I can write I cannot think of halv what I want to say but never mind I send thousands of good wishes, kisses to you Rosa. must close this nonsense for this time you must write Mrs. Macarty to tell her that he was shot through the head killed instantly he fought bravely died with a good hart I believe it to be true he and Twiss both died Christians I think. good by with lots of love to you my dear wife and all of my friends

kiss dolly for me give my love to all inquiring friends

 

James W P

Your loving husband write soon the same

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Time Table as Remembered by James

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This was presumably written not long after the previous letter detailing the aftermath of Antietam. Some of the place names were near impossible to read, so there was some guess work involved – in particular, “Pensaluary” and “Rafam.” Jamie admits that his spelling is bad, but there are some locations that are easy to recognize, such as New York, Baltimore, Washington, Annapolis, and Rockville.

#11 Timetable Page One #11 Timetable Page Two

 

            James W Peckham                                    time table

We left Hartford Aug 25th 1862 on board city Hartford down river. stopt Wethersfield. Middletown. Essex. Saybrook. Saybrookbar. 1 hour. Then up sound to New York. Stopt one hour and Breakfast on board Ferryboat to Elizabethport on the cars. East Pensaluary. To Rafam. To Brattalboro, to York, Pen. To Brooklin, Pen to Baltimore. To took dinner. To Raleigh house. To Annapolis junction. Washington City. Stopt one night. To long Bridge. To Fort Scot Vir. To Fairfax Sema. Vir. Lofed two weeks Started. To Washing camp one night. To Leesboro 3 days. To Rockville one night. To Brookville one night. To Lebanon Chourch do. to New Market do. to Frederick City do. to Middletown 4. Hours. To Boonsboto one hour. To Pottsville stoped one night. 17th We marched to Antietam into the Battle at daylight in morning fought all day until dark when we was marched into a corn field to chase on and take a Battery we took it but paid dearly for it we was cut all to pieces by Grape and canister shot them 2 Brigades of Rebels witch drove us back and they posesion of the cornfield where our dead and wounded lay so we could not get to them until next two days so our mounded had to lay on the ground from 5 oclock Wednesday till Friday at noon when we drove them off so we could get them you better believe I was glad to find Horace alive but he was bad off I tell you it was meeting between us tell you he was so glad to see me he shed tears so did I could not help it although I can stand most anything to see him was to mouch for me my feeling gave way we went from there to here that ends my diary for this time so good by I mean to keep a memberrandum of all of any amount if can as poor as it is if you can read it I shall be glad Excuse bad spelling for I am a bad scholar you know

Jamie says that the wounded had to lay on the ground where they fell from Wednesday evening until noon on Friday. That is a long time to be injured and stranded without food or water. Horace and the other wounded were left to fend for themselves in a cornfield while the other Union soldiers were driven back by the Confederate soldiers. Thankfully, Jamie and Horace were reunited after the battle, and although my grandmother told me according to family stories Horace really wasn’t the nicest of people, he was happy enough to see Jamie that he cried. Both of them did. Horace was actually one of the lucky ones, since he at least got away with his life. Jamie and Horace’s other tent mates were not so lucky.

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Frederick City ~ September 14th, 1862: Burnside and Rebel Prisoners

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Categories: Jamie & Katie, Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

See how he scrawls in the margins? It’s so hard to read, but I’ve done my best and referred to my grandmother’s old transcription.

#8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Envelope

#8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Page One #8 Frederick City - Sep 14th, 1862 Page Two

 

 

            Frederick City, md

Sunday [afternoon] 4 ½ Oclock

Sept. 14th, 1862

 

My Dear Wife,

I now sit down to pen you a few lines let you know how we get along we are well ex the rheumatism I have it in my right leg so has Horace in his r leg it hurts us to march but we hoble along and keep up Twiss & Macaty as well.

we camped at new market last night started from there this morning at 7 Oclock got here at 12 OC Dis of 8 miles without any Breakfast not a mouth full here I got one loaf of bread about as large as your fist for 15 cent the rebels eat up every thing could get in Frederick while they was here, 500 rebels prisoner here in a brick building I have been down to see them. They look tough I tell you they are fiting 8 miles from here we can hear as plain as day a constant fire of cannon the sick wounded are coming in to this city all the time lots of them. but you need not worrie about me fore we shant have a chance to fight for Burnside drives them faster than we can go Burnside will kill all of rebels and kill us trying to get up with him he is on one side of the river Macll on the other Jackson in a tite place. we are on the ground where they fought Thursday now and then a spot of blood on the ground in the next lot to us. I went [off] after some water just now into the city I stoped to a house and got some dinner the woman was strong union I got two cups of tea some ham tomatoes bread Butter she would not take any pay I took her husband’s name Lewis V. Schole. She took my name told if I ever came this way again to stop her husband is with Burnside fiting the rebels good.

I have just been at roll call now I must close this so it will go to night if possible. we have good news Burnside has just brought 250 Rebels prisoners in to the city by our camp I saw them they looked bad enough they are not two that are dresst alike, dirty & [ragged] barefooted at that

we get along first rate for soldiers so don’t worrie about us I have wrote all about us you wanted me to

They are fiting like tigers I tell you we shall load our guns to night for the rebs.

So good night

we all send love to all

Horace said he did not feel able to write this time you can tell Charlotte

Please excuse this writing for is is in hurri wrote on a plate good by from your loving husband James

 

You may send me stamps if you please they are hard to get

Direct as before C I 16th W.D.C.

 

A couple of brief notes: Ambrose Burnside was a general and I’m pretty sure the “Macll” Jamie refers to is George B. McClellan, who was a major general. Both of them played very important roles in the Battle of Antietam, during which they spent a great deal of the time bickering about tactics via couriers. As you may know, that battle ended up being a huge bloody mess with over 22,000 dead, wounded, or missing. But we’ll get to Antietam later.